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365rulesforpremeds

A guide to academic success and social etiquette for competitive (and non-competitive) pre-medical students.

Most of the images belong to us. Otherwise, the original can be found by clicking on the images/links.

Who are we? We are two UCLA alumni who majored in Neuroscience currently pursuing our M.D.s at USC's Keck School of Medicine and Albany Medical College.
Apr 24 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hi, I'm a premed undergrad and I was wondering how, if it's at all possible, do you avoid becoming a gunner?

Gunner mentality stems from an apparent lack of empathy or compassion for others.  A real gunner is selfish and always puts his/her success before anyone and anything. 

As long as you remember to practice compassion and empathy for others (not just your patients), you can avoid becoming a gunner.  Make friends in your classes, offer to share notes, and study together.  

If you struggle with expressing compassion or empathy, start practicing now by being kind to others.  Both are invaluable skills for becoming a successful physician.

Apr 24 '14

Anonymous asked:

I want to be either a trauma surgeon or an orthopedic surgeon (for reference), however I'm really not interested in doing research. Would becoming an EMT and/or paramedic and working during free time/ summers be an adequate replacement for doing undergrad research? It's real experience, and frankly, I kind of need the money. Thoughts?

Sounds like both are good opportunities for experience.  If you are in undergrad, these are solid options.  If you are already in med school, you should know that most surgery specialties look very favorably on research (and publications) in that field of choice.  For orthopedic surgery, one of the more competitive fields, research is basically a requirement for residency.  You can start research during your time in med school, but you should get some experience during undergrad while you have the time to learn proper techniques and build connections.  

Bottom line: if possible, do both!

Apr 24 '14

Anonymous asked:

Do most people go to med school right out of undergrad or do a decent amount of people put it off for a few years?

Now, this number is more evenly divided between those who go straight into med school (or do a combined degree program) and those who take time off. 

Apr 23 '14
We’ve been receiving a lot of questions about what to focus on during undergrad in addition to academics, research, shadowing, volunteering, clinical experience, and other typical pre-med activities.  
While it is important to focus on these activities, remember that college is a time for personal growth.  Someone who can only list pre-med related activities on a resume or can only carry a conversation about medicine or academics is not a well-rounded applicant and overall, not a very interesting person.  Medicine may be your passion, but it shouldn’t be the only thing that you enjoy in life. 
As medical students, we know that college provides you with many unique opportunities to indulge in activities that are not available in medical school (typically because we spend a lot more time studying now in comparison).
Take advantage of the dance groups, tutoring positions, environmental restoration activities, political debates, guest speakers, theater productions, art & photography shows, and other non-medical activities or clubs available to undergraduate students.  College is the best time to discover your hidden talent or artistic outlet, enjoy the experience!

We’ve been receiving a lot of questions about what to focus on during undergrad in addition to academics, research, shadowing, volunteering, clinical experience, and other typical pre-med activities.  

While it is important to focus on these activities, remember that college is a time for personal growth.  Someone who can only list pre-med related activities on a resume or can only carry a conversation about medicine or academics is not a well-rounded applicant and overall, not a very interesting person.  Medicine may be your passion, but it shouldn’t be the only thing that you enjoy in life. 

As medical students, we know that college provides you with many unique opportunities to indulge in activities that are not available in medical school (typically because we spend a lot more time studying now in comparison).

Take advantage of the dance groups, tutoring positions, environmental restoration activities, political debates, guest speakers, theater productions, art & photography shows, and other non-medical activities or clubs available to undergraduate students.  College is the best time to discover your hidden talent or artistic outlet, enjoy the experience!

Apr 22 '14
Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do it. 
Want to get into medical school or a competitive residency? There is a way to get there. You just have to explore your options. It might take longer than anticipated, but it will get you there.

Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do it. 

Want to get into medical school or a competitive residency? There is a way to get there. You just have to explore your options. It might take longer than anticipated, but it will get you there.

Apr 17 '14
Gunner personality disorder. Don’t let it be you!

Gunner personality disorder. Don’t let it be you!

Apr 17 '14
A piece of advice from the resident I am working with: “Don’t get lazy during third and fourth year because you scored high on your Step 1. When I evaluate you, I will note that you are lazy and will not recommend you.”
Same thing applies to pre-meds. Keep working hard and stay humble, even after doing well in your classes and on your MCAT. Diligence shows!

A piece of advice from the resident I am working with: “Don’t get lazy during third and fourth year because you scored high on your Step 1. When I evaluate you, I will note that you are lazy and will not recommend you.”

Same thing applies to pre-meds. Keep working hard and stay humble, even after doing well in your classes and on your MCAT. Diligence shows!

Apr 13 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hello! I am currently a senior in high school that did not get accepted to my dream school (UCLA) with a psychobiology major. I definitely want to become a psychiatrist and go to medical school, but am torn between going to a community college and then transferring to UCLA or attending either UC Irvine or UC Santa Barbara. My question is, if I choose to attend a community college first and then transfer to UCLA, will that affect my ability to attend a medical school?

No. As long as you fulfill your pre-med requirements and do well in community college/UCLA, where you go to school will not impact your application. Keep in mind that community college may be limited in research opportunities, extracurriculars, course difficulties, in comparison to a competitive school such as UCLA. If you are interested in doing research or going beyond what is taught in the classroom, while attending community college, you should actively seek out those opportunities at nearby universities or hospitals.

Apr 13 '14

Anonymous asked:

I'm a high school senior who only recently realized they were interested in medicine. Tons of kids my age have already done research/ volunteered at hospitals/ etc., will I be at a disadvantage for not having done that going into college and applying to med school?

No. You have plenty of time in college to do research and volunteer (and much, much more). College is a time for you to explore what fields you are interested in, so you might even change your mind about medicine during those four years. Keep an open mind and take advantage of the opportunities you will have in college!

Apr 13 '14

bleaklysharpest asked:

Why are orthopedic surgeons considered the "jocks" of medicine?

It’s a stereotype that has some truth to it. Those interested in orthopedic surgery are usually tall, buff, and athletic guys. However, there are definitely petite girls that go into the field.

Apr 13 '14

Anonymous asked:

Will just fulfilling med school pre-reqs classes be enough to get into a top tier med school? (assuming my grades in those classes and overall are stellar and I do some research?) I would like to major in a non-medical field (history probably).

Yes. Majoring in a non-medical field will give you unique learning experiences and perspectives that other applicants may not have. However, majoring in a scientific field will help you pick up materials better in medical school (in general). 

Apr 4 '14

Anonymous asked:

I have a very particular question. Truth be told (and I'm not trying to play myself down, here) I don't go to a good university. My university is not known to help transition students into medical school. We have a small pre-medical advising office, and truly awful professors teaching prerequisites. It seems to be that the school discourages students from taking on a pre-med curriculum. How do you overcome academic difficulty in a uni with no helpful resources?

Unfortunately, when your university can’t help you, you have to find resources on your own.  The internet is a great resource for both academic success and for the medical school application process.  Reach out to your fellow classmates.  First, older students from your institution will have great advice on how to navigate your science classes & the application process.  Second, if you are struggling, it is likely that others in your class are feeling the same way.  Making study groups has always been a helpful resource for us.  On a larger scale, you can use this as an opportunity to change the environment at your institution.  Bring your grievances to your school’s administration and advocate for you and your fellow classmates!

The process of applying to medical school is difficult, but with the help of the internet and your friends, you can be successful.  

Apr 4 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hello! So, I'm a first year undergrad and feel a bit lost as where to go. I'm attending a top university where grade deflation is extremely prominent, which sucks a lot. How do med schools feel about grade trends and lots of experience? I'm spending the next four summers at a guaranteed internship at a private practice pediatrician's office (which will be what I hope to go into.) Along with that, I might volunteer at the local hospital and go into research. What should I focus on? Thank you!

Hi,

This answer should help.  

Med schools love that you have medical experience.  They also want to see who you are as person!  

Don’t allow your status as a “pre-med” to be your only defining quality. 

Apr 4 '14

Anonymous asked:

I've had an extremely rough first 3 semesters in college.. Is there any way to redeem myself before applying to medical school? I know I can do way better, there were just factors that really strayed me away from focusing and doing well in school.

Hello!  (I’m going to answer 2 related questions in one here.)

Sorry to hear that you’ve been having academic difficulties.

In general, medical schools look favorably on upward trends in grades.  However, your GPA still matters.  Some schools will automatically reject your application if you have a cumulative GPA of less than a 3.0 (usually this is disclosed on their websites).  Of course, your MCAT score will also be taken into account, but you must have a high MCAT score to offset a lower GPA.  You can apply for a master’s program after graduation or a post bacc program to further supplement your application.  

You also need to focus on how you will improve your performance to make the most of your remaining time in college.  Evaluate your study habits, your time management, and your priorities.  Having personal difficulties is understandable as long as you show that you have learned from your experience.  If given the opportunity, incorporate your narrative into your personal statement.  If you received D’s or F’s during this time, you must address these grades somewhere on your application and turn the experience into a positive aspect of your journey.  

Bottom line, medical schools appreciate growth.  Show that you have grown as a result of your experience and that it makes you an invaluable asset to their institutions. 

Apr 3 '14

Vestigial Organs Anonymous

melodyinthemaking:

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Source: (The Awkward Yeti)