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365rulesforpremeds

A guide to academic success and social etiquette for competitive (and non-competitive) pre-medical students.

Most of the images belong to us. Otherwise, the original can be found by clicking on the images/links.

Who are we? We are two UCLA alumni who majored in Neuroscience currently pursuing our M.D.s at USC's Keck School of Medicine and Albany Medical College.
Aug 28 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hi! I'm moving to the LA area, and I wanted to start taking some classes at a community college. Do you have any recommendations of community colleges where I can take science classes? Thanks for your help :)

Pasadena City College is a popular place to take community college classes (source: 2 cousins took classes there before transferring to Northeastern & CalTech)

Aug 28 '14

Anonymous asked:

I'm going into my Junior year and I am worried about my GPA/grades. I had a bad semester that brought my GPA down to a 3.4. I gotten mostly B's and a few A's in my Pre-Reqs. I still have to take Physics I/II, Orgo II and Biochem. EC's are research, ER volunteer, tutor, leader in 2 science clubs and a few more little things. Will the GPA ruin me? I'm going to try to raise it. I feel like I have too many B's.

You’ll be fine.  Keep it above a 3.0 and show an upward trend.

Aug 16 '14
Aug 10 '14

(Source: thedailygrit)

Aug 7 '14

Anonymous asked:

Do you have any time left for your hobbies ,or you Only think about medicine and that stuff? Do you have social life?

We definitely make time to socialize and do fun things with friends!

Aug 7 '14

Anonymous asked:

For research, do you suggest emailing multiple professors you're interested in working with? What if more than one of them says yes? How do you decline the other one?

Email first.  If you do get more than one positive reply/interview, politely decline the one you are less interested in.  Be honest about accepting another position elsewhere and thank them for their time.  Keep it short and sweet; professors understand that students need to pursue the opportunities that make them happy.

Aug 1 '14

Anonymous asked:

Would taking classes at a community college raise my GPA even after I've graduated?

As long as you add it to your AMCAs application, it will be calculated into your GPA. Medical schools may treat these classes differently in regards to fulfilling prereqs, but your actual GPA would reflect the changes.

Aug 1 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hello! I was wondering if you could give me methods of raising my GPA. For instance, can I take classes at a community college after I've graduated? Thanks so much!

This answered question should help.  You can definitely take classes at a CC or through a university’s extension program too.  Remember that your science GPA and your cumulative GPA will be calculated separately in your AMCAs so focus on taking science classes for higher grades.

Jul 31 '14
diarymdstudent:

mymedlife:

Why do you think those two are hugging and crying? my resident asks as we watch our attending embrace a man about his age. It’s because one year ago that patient was given four months to live. I saw him then, he looked like he was on his deathbed.
No one knew what he had
But our attending figured it out. He diagnosed him.
It was a rare form of leukemia.
You know it’s rare when Google’s feeble attempts to help out only turns up a handful of journal articles.
Do you know how he knew?
He read an article about it a few weeks before. 
Everyone laughed at him, but he remembered that article and demanded we run the tests. 
Turns out, he was right.
Never forget, reading saves lives. 
To the first years, just staring out your med school journey, not sure why they signed up for this. To those who just finished boards, and never want to pick up a text book again. To the premeds, who just want to finish up their pre reqs and get to medical school already. To the spouses, who wonder if they will ever see their significant others without a textbook again.
This is why we do it.
This is why we stay up past our bedtimes.
And wake up before the sun.
This is why we memorize overly complicated pathways until we can do them in our sleep.
Why we can name every class of antibiotic, even those no one uses anymore.
This is why we push ourselves to be better every day than we were the last.
Why we put our lives on hold.
Not for more letters to put behind our name.
Not for some number on a score sheet.
Not because mom told us to.
We do it because one day, a day that will occur far faster than we are ready for, we’ll have our own patients.
One day someone will come in and ask you “so doc, what is it.” And you’ll say to yourself, I know this.
So when the tediousness of studying gets you down, don’t forget:
Reading saves lives.

This feels like it needs epic music to go with it. 

diarymdstudent:

mymedlife:

Why do you think those two are hugging and crying? my resident asks as we watch our attending embrace a man about his age. It’s because one year ago that patient was given four months to live. I saw him then, he looked like he was on his deathbed.

No one knew what he had

But our attending figured it out. He diagnosed him.

It was a rare form of leukemia.

You know it’s rare when Google’s feeble attempts to help out only turns up a handful of journal articles.

Do you know how he knew?

He read an article about it a few weeks before.

Everyone laughed at him, but he remembered that article and demanded we run the tests.

Turns out, he was right.

Never forget, reading saves lives.

To the first years, just staring out your med school journey, not sure why they signed up for this. To those who just finished boards, and never want to pick up a text book again. To the premeds, who just want to finish up their pre reqs and get to medical school already. To the spouses, who wonder if they will ever see their significant others without a textbook again.

This is why we do it.

This is why we stay up past our bedtimes.

And wake up before the sun.

This is why we memorize overly complicated pathways until we can do them in our sleep.

Why we can name every class of antibiotic, even those no one uses anymore.

This is why we push ourselves to be better every day than we were the last.

Why we put our lives on hold.

Not for more letters to put behind our name.

Not for some number on a score sheet.

Not because mom told us to.

We do it because one day, a day that will occur far faster than we are ready for, we’ll have our own patients.

One day someone will come in and ask you “so doc, what is it.” And you’ll say to yourself, I know this.

So when the tediousness of studying gets you down, don’t forget:

Reading saves lives.

This feels like it needs epic music to go with it. 

Jul 30 '14
I thought the “interpret the passage” questions ended with the MCAT & college English… *sigh*

I thought the “interpret the passage” questions ended with the MCAT & college English… *sigh*

Jul 29 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hello, I just wanted to say that the blog you guys/gals have up is amazing so thank you for that! I have a question about frustration.. did you guys ever feel frustrated from some of the basic science classes? I feel as if the subject matter is very difficult for me but some medical students are telling me that after the 2nd year of medical school it will be mostly over. Is this true and what do y'all think about built-up frustration over basic science classes?

First, thanks! :)

I def feel this way a lot of the time (in fact, I have an exam on Friday that I’m clearly not studying for).  

I find it helpful to engage in activities that provide me with patient contact.  I spent my summer pursuing a health-related internship and shadowing.  During the school year, I volunteer for health fairs, free clinics, community events, community service projects at school, and other types of outreach when I have time.  Simple things like helping with health education at community events or taking blood pressure at the the health clinic help me stay focused on why I chose this profession.  I even learned how to draw blood at a health fair during my first year (at my school, we learn this during orientation before 3rd year)!

Despite all this, staying focused on the basic sciences is still tough for me.  Studying in groups makes the process bearable and even fun!  Regardless, it is a work in progress, even for a med student.  Hang in there! 

Jul 29 '14

Anonymous asked:

do you retake chem, ochem, and bio classes in post-bacs to strengthen your record? or how does the program work?

Most programs have you take a typical med school’s prerequisite science courses or the classes that you would take during year 1 of med school, all for a grade.  They also provided personal statement workshops, interview help, and other academic counseling services to help with your application.

Jul 29 '14

Anonymous asked:

What were your favorite Neuro upperdivs? do you have any specific profs to definitely take or avoid? thanks!

I loved NS 102 (Neuroanatomy) w/ Dr. Schiebel (who has since retired) and all the classes taught by Dr. Chandler Module 1 of NS 101A and NS M145 (Mechanisms of Movement).  The NS 101 series was interesting b/c it was the first set of classes that focused on the details of neuroscience.  I also took an unexpectedly interesting NS upper div on research methods & neurodegenerative diseases.  I wasn’t very interested in research methods, but I liked how the professors emphasized the clinical application.

Jul 29 '14

Anonymous asked:

I go to UCLA and i feel like sometimes the professors don't want you to succeed, specifically in the science prereqs. Does it get better in the upper divs? (plz say yes haha)

Lower div science classes are tough in general.  I like to maintain a positive outlook on my professors, but I did think that it got better with upper divs.  For me, I think it got better because I was more interested in the subject matter presented in the classes.  

One thing I noticed is that many professors are much more approachable and supportive when you take the time to meet with them one-on-one.  Try reaching out to your professors and TAs!

Jul 28 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hi! I recently graduated from UCLA, and I didn't decide I wanted to pursue a career in medicine until the end of my third year. I didn't do so well in my upper divs (I was an MCDB major, lots of B's with a couple C's), and I didn't do any research, aside from taking the MCDB research lab course (104 AL/BL). I have no idea what the next step is. Do you have any advice? Thank you for your help!

The answer we gave here should help.  With a few C’s, you could definitely benefit from taking more science classes to help boost your GPA through a post-bac or special master’s program.  You could also look into finding a job ER scribing for the clinical experience or a research assistant position while you’re still in the UCLA area.  

The next step is always tough, but you have lots of options!