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365rulesforpremeds

A guide to academic success and social etiquette for competitive (and non-competitive) pre-medical students.

Most of the images belong to us. Otherwise, the original can be found by clicking on the images/links.

Who are we? We are two UCLA alumni who majored in Neuroscience currently pursuing our M.D.s at USC's Keck School of Medicine and Albany Medical College.
Jul 17 '14

Anonymous asked:

I heard accepting AP credit for subjects like chemistry and biology will hurt a medical school application. Is it true?

Not sure about whether medical schools even accept AP credit for required classes. Some may, others may not. Definitely check with your school’s advisors/career center before using your AP credits to skip required classes.

Jul 17 '14

Anonymous asked:

how do you suggest studying for physics 6A?

This was soooooo long ago now. I think doing practice problems after lectures and using practice exams are always helpful.

Also go to office hours! Sometimes having different people explain to you how to do problem will help you understand it better!

Jul 16 '14

Anonymous asked:

"Don’t even get me started on where a pre-med student can stand…(in the corner, not touching anything)." No please, get started on where a PRE-MED student can stand in an OPERATING room, besides the fact that a pre-med student has no business in the room whatsoever. Everyone else in the room is there to help, or learn, pre-med students do not have anything to learn yet and they definitely have nothing to contribute. It's post like these that make "pre-meds" look like they think their entitled.

I am sorry you had bad experiences with pre-med students. While some can definitely come off as entitled, the majority are hardworking and grateful to have the opportunity to observe. Most pre-med students know their place and are careful to not get in the way of anyone.

It is true that pre-med students do not have anything to contribute, but they are there to LEARN! They may not know all the medical jargons, but they will learn what it is like to be a medical professional, even by just standing in the corner of the OR. If pre-medical students are never allowed in the OR, how will they know if the field is right for them? Should they base their career choice purely on the OR depiction on TV shows? 

The caption, along with the original post, is meant to lightheartedly poke fun at the hierarchy in the OR. It is not a post to protest or complain. Everyone has their place in the OR, may it be the attending, resident, medical student, surgical tech, or the pre-med student. While not everyone has something to contribute, everyone has something to learn from the experience. Even neurosurgeons were once pre-med students.

Jul 16 '14

Anonymous asked:

when did you guys take your MCATS? and when did you apply to med school? (months) thanks!

MCATs: September of the summer before 4th year
AMCAs: June/July after graduation

Jul 16 '14

Anonymous asked:

how do I go about getting research @ UCLA? If I'm interested in the SRP 99 positions listed online, do I go ahead and email the professor with my CV and resume or do I have to complete a safety course first?

Email first, schedule an interview/meeting, then do whatever the lab requires for certifications.

Jul 6 '14
Jul 6 '14
thisfuturemd:

dontget2close:

seriously my partner was on like 3 steps for an ileostomy takedown

Yep.

Don’t even get me started on where a pre-med student can stand…(in the corner, not touching anything).

thisfuturemd:

dontget2close:

seriously my partner was on like 3 steps for an ileostomy takedown

Yep.

Don’t even get me started on where a pre-med student can stand…(in the corner, not touching anything).

Jul 4 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hi, I was really considering being a neuroscience major. But I ended up choosing not to because I didn't really know what other things I could do with that degree. Are there many opportunities for jobs or otherwise with just a 4 year neuroscience degree? Thank you!

Lots of people graduate from college with degrees that don’t relate at all to the field in which they end up working.  

I have classmates who have chosen careers in research, industry (pharmaceuticals), tech, and law, just to name a few possibilities.  Your college major doesn’t need to define your life path.  Focus on the marketable skills that you learned while in college & use these as talking points for your job application process.

Good luck!

Jul 4 '14

Anonymous asked:

Umm guys I'm an international student and plan on a career in medicine and I really need a LOT of help. This is hella confusing.. Could we communicate via email or something? Please? I would greatly appreciate y'all helping me out.

Hi!
We were both US students applying to US medical schools only, so we don’t have any experience with international applications.  This site has some information that might help though!

Jun 24 '14
aspiringdoctors:

modernathena90:

thenotquitedoctor:

orqueen:

OH MY GOD. FLOW CHART TO DECIDE WHAT SPECIALTY YOU SHOULD GO IN FOR MEDICINE. LOVE!

I feel like Infectious Disease Medicine is the stepchild of the specialties…
It’s never listed on these flowcharts, doesn’t have a stereotype (that I have heard of yet at least), and is one of the most underpaid specialties per years of training compared to other comparable training paths. ID is totally awesome, just completely lacking in procedures, which is sadly how doctors typically have to make $$$. 

I love ID. Two of my mentors at schools are ID docs, and they are my favorite people in the world (tied with my cardiology mentor). I think it takes a special kind of person to decide to go into such an undervalued but amazing specialty- maybe the kind of person who puts no stock in flow charts about what specialty you should choose, hence not being included on the flowcharts?
thenotquitedoctor
Pediatric EM seems to be calling me…..

aspiringdoctors:

modernathena90:

thenotquitedoctor:

orqueen:

OH MY GOD. FLOW CHART TO DECIDE WHAT SPECIALTY YOU SHOULD GO IN FOR MEDICINE. LOVE!

I feel like Infectious Disease Medicine is the stepchild of the specialties…

It’s never listed on these flowcharts, doesn’t have a stereotype (that I have heard of yet at least), and is one of the most underpaid specialties per years of training compared to other comparable training paths. ID is totally awesome, just completely lacking in procedures, which is sadly how doctors typically have to make $$$. 

I love ID. Two of my mentors at schools are ID docs, and they are my favorite people in the world (tied with my cardiology mentor). I think it takes a special kind of person to decide to go into such an undervalued but amazing specialty- maybe the kind of person who puts no stock in flow charts about what specialty you should choose, hence not being included on the flowcharts?
thenotquitedoctor

Pediatric EM seems to be calling me…..

(Source: dudewhyamistillonthis)

Jun 23 '14
Jun 9 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hi I'm a high school senior and I'm planning to major in neuroscience. I'm going to a community college and I wanted to get your advice if I should get my associates or just enough credits to transfer. I personally would like to transfer within a year but is that likely.

You should definitely transfer. You’ll have to work incredibly hard (maintain at least a 3.5 GPA) to transfer into a “good school,” but in the end, you’ll have a B.S. or B.A. that is the same as anyone else’s.

Not sure about transferring into an Ivy from a CC. You should call the Ivy that you’re interested in to find out their policy on transfers from community colleges.

Good luck!

Jun 4 '14

(Source: lisacongdon.com)

May 28 '14

Anonymous asked:

Hello, I'm about to start my freshman year studying Neuroscience and am aspiring to attend Stanford Med. What advice do you have for someone about to begin their freshman year (aside from the obvious getting good grades)?

Congrats!  Starting college is exciting and so much fun.  Our best advice is to take advantage of all of your opportunities!

Most importantly, remember Rule #81!

May 28 '14

Anonymous asked:

I'm studying for the MCAT and really struggling with the physics and o chem sections. Do you think it's better to just keep going and try my best studying those sections or focus more on the sections I know so that at least I know I'm going to do great on some part of the MCAT?

You should try your best to present as a well rounded applicant by doing well in all your sections - an average of 10 per section is usually considered a solid score.  If you are doing well below 10 on your physics and o chem sections, study those until you are confident that you can get a 10 in the actual exam.  Don’t neglect your other sections; you want to maintain your skills in those areas as well.  

Try scheduling more time each day to study just your physical sciences and less time for other sections.  Taking practice exams is also a great way to gauge your progress, so take as many as you can!